How Much is a Cord of Wood? Find Out Here

The volume of a cord of wood can be calculated by multiplying the length in feet by its width in feet, then dividing that amount by 128. The result will give you the total cubic footage in the cord. A one-cord bundle will have 16 cubic feet, while a two-cord bundle will have 32 cubic feet. A three-cord bundle would have 48 cubic feet, and so on until you reach eight cords which equals 1024 cubic feet.

A cord of wood is fireplace fuel which typically consists of four to eight large logs or branches with 128 cubic feet or 1/3rd acre foot. The dimensions are usually 4’x4’x8′. Logs are often seasoned for one year before being sold as fireplace wood. So a one-year old log will have a moisture content of 33% and a two-year old log at 25%.

How Much is a Cord of Wood

The cost of a cord of wood is determined by the type of wood used, whether it is split or not, and where you buy it from. The range can be anywhere from $50 to as much as $250 per cord depending on how good the deal is. It also depends on what area you live in which determines how costly it may become. In some instances, buyers pay for all after delivery costs such as splitting and stacking included.

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In some areas around North America, a cord of firewood sells for between US$75 and US$150 (per cord or per facecord ). The official definition of “cord” in the firewood business is 4’x4’x8′ (128 cubic feet) as stated above. This applies to all regions, but people tend to buy their wood based on what they know and see around them. In areas where there are a lot of forest fires, some people have been known to buy cheap ($50/facecord ) greenfirewood from those who have been affected by it.

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In Alberta

In Alberta a cord is a 4x8x8 cube which equals 128 cubic feet. Prices vary depending on the quality and type of wood used for burning purposes. It can range anywhere from $65-$ per cord depending on whether you buy face cords or full cord. Depending on the size of the order, delivery is usually included in price unless you are located out in rural areas where transportation costs are high.

In British Columbia

In British Columbia a cord is measured as 128 cubic feet (4’x8’x8′). The prices per cord can range from $100-$ depending on whether it’s split and what type of wood it is such as cedar or pine. Most companies also charge more for delivery due to fuel costs but some don’t charge any extra fee which makes buying firewood pretty attractive.

In Manitoba

In Manitoba a cord is considered different than most places; 4 feet wide by 8 feet long and stacked 8 feet high! Usually this results in an amount that is slightly less than 128 cubic feet. Pricing for this type of firewood is usually in the range of $120-$175 depending on where you live and the quality of wood used.

In New Brunswick

In New Brunswick a cord is defined as 16 cubic meters; 4’x4’x8′. The normal price per cord ranges from $75 to $125 dollars depending on what type of wood it is like ‘Kiln Dried’ or ‘Seasoned’. Prices also depend on whether its delivered or not along with how far away you are located.

In Newfoundland & Labrador

In Newfoundland & Labrador, one cord (or facecord) equals 1/3rd of a short tonne (which equals approximately 27 cubic ft). The normal price per cord ranges between $90 – $125 depending on the type of wood it is like spruce, tamarack or other types. It’s also based on how far away you are located and if delivery is included in price.

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In New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, a cord (or rick) is defined as 8 feet wide x 4 feet high x 4 feet deep; 128 cubic feet (4’x8’x8′). The normal price per cord ranges from $100 to $200 depending on the type of wood it is like softwood or hardwood along with location etc. Firewood can be delivered in some areas but in others they don’t offer that service so would have to pickup yourself which may cost more in gas money.

In Nova Scotia

In Nova Scotia, a cord (or standard) means 4 feet wide x 4 feet high x 8 feet long; 128 cubic feet (4’x8’x8′). The prices for firewood can range anywhere from $200 to even over $300 due to the fact that there is no limit on the amount of wood one person can purchase at one time and the fact that it can be delivered at a cheap rate. If buying less than a full cord, its usually $300 to $500 if you want it split and stacked for an extra fee.

In Ontario

In Ontario, a cord (or facecord) is 4’x8’x4′; 32 cubic feet (1/3rd of a short tonne). The cost per cord varies depending on the type of wood and whether or not delivery is included in price or not. Prices can range anywhere from $75 – $150 dollars but some companies will only charge by half cords instead of full cords so take your pick! Some places also offer ‘stacking service’. It’s where they stack firewood neatly for you for an extra fee.

In Prince Edward Island

In Prince Edward Island a cord is 16’x4’x8′; 128 cubic feet (4’x8’x8′). The prices for firewood can range anywhere from $75 – $120 depending on the type of wood it is like hardwood, softwood or pine and whether or not its already split or not. Some companies offer delivery which costs extra based on location/distance away from the supplier.

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In Quebec

In Quebec, a cord (or standard) means 4 feet wide x 8 feet long; 64 cubic feet (2’x4’x8′). The price per cord depends on how far away you are located and if delivery is included in price or not. If you don’t need to have it delivered and you pick it up yourself, it costs between $60 – $150 dollars depending on the quality of wood used.

In Saskatchewan

In Saskatchewan a cord (or full-cord) is 4 feet wide x 8 feet long; 32 cubic feet (1/3rd of a short tonne). The normal price per cord ranges from $100 to $200 dollars but some companies will only charge by half cords instead of full cords so take your pick! Some places also offer ‘stacking service’. It’s where they stack firewood neatly for you for an extra fee.